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APPLYING FOR OTHER BENEFITS

ISSUE DATE: 09/2017

MFIP:
Require clients to apply for and accept benefits from other programs for which they appear eligible if those benefits would reduce their MFIP benefit. This includes SSI and Unemployment Insurance. They must apply for benefits within 30 days of being told of their potential eligibility. Deny or terminate eligibility if clients fail to apply without good cause. Good cause for failure to apply for these benefits is allowed when circumstances beyond the control of the applicant or participant prevent the applicant or participant from making an application.

Do not require clients to reapply for benefits which had been denied before, unless there has been a change in circumstances or eligibility requirements of that benefit program.

When a member of the MFIP unit has been awarded Workers’ Compensation, any MFIP received during the period covered by the Workers’ Compensation settlement or award is subject to recovery by the DHS Benefit Recovery Section (BRS). BRS has the authority to recover subsistence related to a workers’ compensation injury. An Interim Assistance Agreement (IAA) is not required.


DWP:

Follow MFIP. Clients applying for SSI and SSDI are considered unlikely to benefit from DWP and should be converted to MFIP. See 0008.06.24 (DWP Conversion or Referral to MFIP).


SNAP:

No provisions.


MSA, GA, GRH:

Require clients to apply for benefits from other programs for which they appear eligible such as RSDI, SSI, Unemployment Insurance, and Veterans benefits.

People referred to apply for RSDI and/or SSI should be referred to a Social Security benefits advocacy provider to assist with the application process. See 0012.12.06 (Special Services – Applying for Social Security).

A person may be eligible for SSI and/or RSDI if they have a physical and/or mental impairment (including an emotional or learning problem) that will last more than a year, or result in death, and have significant functional impairments that affect their ability to do work activities. See 0029.06.03 (Supplemental Security Income Program), 0029.06.06 (Retirement, Survivors & Disability Insurance).

The Social Security Administration does not consider chemical dependency a disability. However, some people with chemical dependency might have other physical and/or mental impairments that would qualify.

In general, clients must apply for benefits within 30 days of when you notified them about their potential eligibility. Deny or terminate eligibility after 30 days if clients fail to apply without good cause. An individual may receive an extension to the 30-day requirement to apply for other benefits if they have good cause to not apply. A worker will need to enter a MAXIS case note stating good cause was granted.

A client has good cause not to apply for other benefits for any reason that is reasonable and justified in the context of surrounding circumstances.

Clients who do not appear eligible for other benefits should not be referred to apply.

Three months prior to the 62nd birthday of a person who has any U.S. work history, require him/her to sign an Interim Assistance Agreement (Non-SSI) (DHS-1795A) (PDF) and to file for Social Security early retirement benefits.

Do not require clients to reapply for benefits which were previously denied unless there has been a change in circumstances or eligibility requirements of the benefit program.

Refer clients to other programs using the Notice to Apply for Other Maintenance Benefits (DHS-2116) (PDF). Within 30 days of the date of the referral, clients must sign and date an SSI Interim Assistance Authorization (DHS-1795) (PDF) if being referred to SSI, or an Interim Assistance Agreement (Non-SSI) (DHS-1795A) (PDF) if being referred to other benefit programs. They must also give written consent to the exchange of information between the county agency and the office administering the benefits for which they are applying when applying for benefits other than SSI. See 0012.12.03 (Interim Assistance Agreements).

For MSA, deny or terminate people who do not get SSI or RSDI because they have exhausted time-limited benefits. People in this category may apply for GA. The loss of SSI by a non-citizen who has reached the SSI time limit does not prohibit GA eligibility. Do not consider the loss of SSI due to exhausted time-limited benefits to be a failure to meet or comply with Social Security Administration program requirements.

Deny or terminate people who are suspended or terminated from RSDI or SSI for failure to meet or comply with Social Security Administration or other program requirements. This includes failure to comply with a required treatment program and failure to get a representative payee.

NOTE:

RSDI payments are specifically exempted from recovery by federal law. DHS revised the non-SSI IAA to include a statement telling RSDI clients that RSDI payments, both retroactive and current, cannot be garnished, attached, executed upon or levied upon. It also tells clients that, although they are free to use their RSDI benefits to repay their interim assistance debt, they cannot be forced to use their RSDI benefits for this purpose.


Clients must apply for workers' compensation benefits to which they may be entitled. When a member of GA or MSA unit has been awarded Workers’ Compensation, any GA or MSA received during the period covered by the Workers’ Compensation settlement or award is subject to recovery by the DHS Benefit Recovery Section (BRS). BRS has the authority to recover subsistence related to a workers’ compensation injury. An interim assistance agreement is not required.

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