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Minnesota Department of Human Services Provider Manual
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Obstetric Services and HIV Counseling

Revised: 06-14-2016

  • Eligible Providers
  • Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM)
  • Maternal Health Education
  • Eligible Recipients
  • Authorization Requirements
  • Ambulatory Uterine Monitoring Device
  • Covered Services
  • Inpatient Birth Weight Requirement
  • Evidence-based Childbirth Program Policy
  • Prenatal Screening and Enhanced Services for “At-risk” Pregnancies
  • HIV Counseling and Testing for Pregnant Women
  • Ultrasounds for Zika Virus
  • Noncovered Services
  • Billing
  • Definitions
  • Legal References
  • MHCP obstetric services cover prenatal, enhanced prenatal for at-risk pregnancies, delivery, postpartum, and newborn care.

    Eligible Providers

  • • Certified nurse midwife
  • • Certified nurse practitioner
  • • Clinical nurse specialist
  • • Clinics
  • • Doctor of osteopathy
  • • Outpatient hospital
  • • Physician
  • • Physician assistant
  • • Physician extenders
  • Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM)

    A certified nurse midwife is a person licensed as a registered nurse by the Board of Nursing and certified by a national nurse certification organization acceptable to the Board of Nursing to practice as a nurse midwife.

    • A CNM may enroll as an independent MHCP provider

  • • CNMs must practice within a system that provides for consultation, collaborative management, and referral as indicated by the health status of patients
  • • A CNM may prescribe, administer and dispense drugs and therapeutic devices within the CNM scope of practice as defined in Minnesota law
  • Maternal Health Education

    Eligible providers may provide and bill for prenatal education classes. Eligible providers include:

    • Enrolled physicians

    • Nurse practitioners

    • Physician assistants

    • Clinical nurse specialists

    • Certified nurse midwives

    In addition, clinics and outpatient hospitals, whose prenatal education program is directed by one of the enrolled providers, may bill for RNs or health educators with at least a baccalaureate level degree in health education or certification for prenatal education, or both, from one of the following organizations:

  • • International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC)
  • • International Childbirth Education Association (ICEA)
  • • Lamaze
  • • National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC)
  • Eligible Recipients

    All MHCP recipients (Medical Assistance (MA) and MinnesotaCare) are eligible, except people in programs EH and FP.

    Authorization Requirements

    Ambulatory Uterine Monitoring Device

    Equipment and Systems Standards
    Authorization requests for the ambulatory uterine device will be considered when the following equipment standards are met:

  • • The equipment is ambulatory, which means monitoring may occur while the patient is conducting daily activities. A unit that must be plugged into an electrical outlet to function is not ambulatory
  • • The equipment records data specifically labeled with the time on the printout
  • • The equipment is designed for use by a lay person
  • • The system monitors uterine activity for a minimum of two one-hour daily sessions
  • • The equipment transmits uterine contraction data on a daily basis
  • • The prescribing physician or certified nurse midwife is notified immediately by a nurse when abnormal contraction data or contraction data that fall outside of the prescribing physician’s or certified nurse midwife’s parameters is transmitted
  • • The physician or certified nurse midwife receives a report and graph describing each week’s uterine activity on a weekly basis
  • • The belt fits properly for the monitor to work effectively. The device may not accommodate extremely obese patients
  • Obtain authorization for the rental of this device from the Authorization Medical Review Agent. It is the responsibility of the medical supply provider to submit the Authorization Form (DHS-4695) (PDF) with:

  • • Sufficient information from the medical supply provider establishing that criteria listed in the “Equipment Standards” section have been met
  • • Sufficient information from the prescribing physician or certified nurse midwife to establish that criteria listed in the “Medical Necessity Standards” section has been met
  • Medical Necessity Standards and Documentation
    MHCP will approve authorization requests for this device only when the following requirements are met:

  • • The patient is “at-risk” for preterm labor and delivery based on the standardized prenatal risk assessment tool (for example, ACOG’s Obstetric Medical History), or an assessment tool that is developed or customized in the provider’s office and is equivalent to one of the standardized tools and a combination of the following medical necessity factors exist:
  • • Occurrence of preterm labor with current pregnancy (describe)
  • • Preterm labor or delivery with a previous pregnancy
  • • Multiple gestation
  • • An anomalous uterus
  • • Cervical problems including: an incompetent cervix, cervical changes (describe) and placenta previa
  • • The patient is, or has recently been, under treatment to prevent preterm labor with a combination of the following methods:
  • • Bed rest or restricted activity (describe restricted activity)
  • • Tocolysis drug therapy (describe), including dosage, frequency, or both
  • • Increased office visits or phone contact for patient counseling and monitoring
  • • Hospitalization for preterm labor (admission and discharge dates)
  • • Less expensive appropriate alternative treatment was undertaken but was not successful or was contraindicated (describe)
  • • The device is prescribed for a period that begins no earlier than the 24th week and continues no longer than the 34th week
  • • In the opinion of the physician or certified nurse midwife, the patient is capable of complying with a home monitoring program (explain)
  • • The information required above is in letter format, individualized to the patient, and includes the following:
  • • Documentation of each item listed under medical necessity standards
  • • The duration of pregnancy (EDC)
  • Covered Services

    MHCP established a blended rate for professional services related to vaginal delivery, cesarean delivery and vaginal deliveries after a cesarean delivery (VBAC). When MHCP pays a corresponding hospital claim for vaginal delivery with complications, claims for cesarean section delivery will be reprocessed at a higher rate. Contact the specific MCO for information about changes to reimbursement rates for births for MCO enrollees.

    Inpatient Birth Weight Requirement

    Refer to the Inpatient Hospital Birth Weight Requirement section.

    Evidence-based Childbirth Program

    Refer to Evidence-Based Childbirth Program Policy in the Inpatient Hospital Services section for a full explanation of the evidence-based childbirth program policy.

    Prenatal Screening and Enhanced Services for “At-risk” Pregnancies

    Screen all pregnant MHCP recipients using a standardized prenatal risk assessment tool (for example, ACOG’s Obstetric Medical History), or an assessment tool that is developed or customized in the provider’s office and is equivalent to one of the standardized tools. Keep a copy of the prenatal risk assessment in the recipient’s record. The assessment tool, whether standardized or customized, must maintain the information in a single document that can be easily separated from the medical record for review.

    Based on information gathered from the prenatal assessment and screening process, a provider may determine that a recipient is “at-risk” for a poor birth outcome. Recipients determined to be “at-risk” are eligible for enhanced services. The primary care provider is responsible for ordering and referring the recipient to enhanced services. MHCP encourages providers to address these issues throughout the pregnancy. If necessary, up to three classes per day may be covered.

    Enhanced Services for “At-risk” Pregnancies
    Six enhanced services are covered for “at-risk” pregnancies:

  • • “At-risk” Antepartum Management
  • • Care Coordination
  • • Prenatal Health Education I
  • • Prenatal Health Education II: Lifestyle and Parenting Support
  • • Prenatal Nutrition Education
  • • Postpartum Follow-up Home Visit
  • Refer to Billing Enhanced Services for limits and eligible providers.

    “At-risk” Antepartum Management (H1001)
    When a pregnant woman is identified as being “at-risk”, the primary care provider is eligible for MHCP payment for the additional time and expertise required, beyond routine prenatal care, to manage the recipient’s care based on her “at-risk” status. The primary care provider who is responsible for the care of the recipient during pregnancy determines what additional health services would benefit the recipient and provides medical care as determined by the woman’s needs.

    Care Coordination (H1002)
    Care coordination is the development, implementation and ongoing evaluation of the plan of care for an “at-risk” pregnant woman. The care coordinator provides continuity, makes referrals, monitors the woman’s progress and advocates for the woman to assure access to services that support a healthy pregnancy and improve birth outcomes.

    Care coordination services include:

  • • Documentation that the pregnant woman is “at-risk” for a poor birth outcome
  • • Development of an individual plan of care that addresses the woman’s specific needs and risks related to the pregnancy
  • • Ongoing evaluation and, when appropriate, revision of the plan of care
  • • Involvement of the pregnant woman and her support network in the assessment and plan of care
  • • Coordination of services and referrals to appropriate community resources and health care providers
  • • Advocacy for the pregnant woman in working with the various health care providers
  • • Monitoring, on an ongoing basis, to determine whether or not the woman is receiving enhanced prenatal services in a timely and economical manner, and that each service is of expected and adequate quality
  • Documentation Requirements for Care Coordination
    Documentation requirements include:

  • • A written, individualized plan of care that addresses the woman’s specific needs related to the pregnancy, including any revisions of that plan
  • • Evidence of all referrals made, and follow-up on those referrals
  • • Evidence of the following activities: monitoring, coordinating and managing nutrition and prenatal education services to ensure that they are provided in the most economical, efficient and cost effective manner
  • Prenatal Health Education
    Health education for the “at-risk” pregnant woman is a core intervention that is preventive, resource-efficient and consistent with the recipient’s individualized plan of care. Educational services are based on the pregnant woman’s risks as identified on the prenatal screening tool, and her needs as determined by the primary care provider and care coordinator in consultation with the pregnant woman.

    Designated “at-risk” pregnant women require innovative and individualized approaches to prenatal care to effectively meet their educational needs. Educational interventions target risk factors, medical conditions and health behaviors that can be alleviated or improved through education. Educational services begin with the initial assessment visit and continue throughout the perinatal period. Services can be provided on a one-to-one basis, in small group settings or in classes individualized to the woman’s own needs and interests. Prenatal health education promotes behavior changes in the woman’s daily life that will support a healthy pregnancy and result in an improved perinatal outcome.

    Prenatal Health Education I (H1003) provides general information about pregnancy and prenatal care. It also covers high-risk medical conditions and behaviors that can be alleviated or improved through education. It includes the following:

  • • Information about pregnancy and physical changes that occur during pregnancy
  • • Normal changes due to pregnancy (specific to trimester):
  • • Maternal anatomy and physiology
  • • Fetal development
  • • Emotional psychosexual issues
  • • Description and importance of continued prenatal care
  • • Comfort measures
  • • Self-care during pregnancy
  • • Pregnancy danger warning signs
  • • Specific medical conditions
  • • Diagnosis and significance of condition during pregnancy
  • • Treatments including medications, activity level, options and rationale
  • • Appropriate referrals
  • • Information to prepare the pregnant woman for the birth process when she is near the end of the second trimester or early third trimester:
  • • Anatomy and physiology of labor and delivery
  • • Coping skills
  • • Medical management
  • • Hospital procedures
  • • Danger signs
  • • Communication with health providers
  • • Information that helps the pregnant woman identify and take steps to prevent preterm labor and delivery:
  • • Symptoms of preterm labor
  • • Self-detection of preterm labor
  • • Treatment
  • • Preventive measures
  • Prenatal Health Education II: Lifestyle & Parenting Support (H1003)
    Lifestyle and Parenting Support Educational Services supplement the Prenatal Health Education I services, and are necessary for pregnant women who require more time and specialized education to bring about change in risk behaviors and lifestyle. Behavior and lifestyle changes resulting from this early and consistent education may have long-term impacts on improving the health of the mother, baby and subsequent pregnancies.

    Topics addressed in Prenatal Education II will depend on the individual needs of the “at-risk” pregnant woman. They may include:

  • • Education and assistance to stop smoking
  • • Effects of smoking on mother and fetal development
  • • Smoking cessation or decrease smoking education
  • • Referral to support program to quit
  • • Education and assistance to stop the use of alcohol or street drugs
  • • Effects of alcohol and drugs on fetal development
  • • Abstinence education
  • • Referral to support program if needed
  • • Education on safe use of over the counter (OTC) medications and prescription drugs
  • • Emphasis on need to consult with primary provider before using any type of medication during pregnancy
  • • Environmental and occupational hazards (for example, lead)
  • • Identify potential exposure to hazard in woman’s own environment
  • • Effects on fetal growth and development
  • • Efforts to minimize exposure
  • • Referrals for follow-up if needed
  • • Stress management
  • • Identification of potential stressors in the woman’s life: job, unemployment, school
  • • Self-identification of signs of stress
  • • Relaxation techniques
  • • Referral to support services when appropriate
  • • Coping skills
  • • Communication skills and resources
  • • Family support systems
  • • Health care providers
  • • Building self-esteem
  • • Parenting skills to meet the physical, emotional and intellectual needs of the infant; bonding
  • • Identification and affirmation of positive prenatal parenting behaviors
  • • Infant needs and cares
  • • Nurturing
  • • Infant feeding preparation
  • • Referral to community resources if needed
  • • Planning for continuous, comprehensive pediatric care following delivery
  • Documentation Requirements for Prenatal Health Education I and II
    Documentation requirements include: Evidence that education, information, or both was provided, amount of time spent, materials used, notes about the woman’s reactions to information, review of information at subsequent visits, dates and person(s) providing the service, referrals and follow-up.

    Prenatal Nutrition Education
    Prenatal Nutrition Education (H1003) includes nutritional assessment and education that identifies nutritional risks and problems that the pregnant woman may already have or be in danger of developing. Develop an individualized nutrition care plan for each “at-risk” pregnant woman based on the assessment of her nutritional status, and address the prevention and resolution of identified risks and problems. Incorporate the nutrition care plan into the overall individualized plan of care.

    Nutrition interventions include individual or group (or both) nutrition education, and provide information that will assist the pregnant woman in making informed nutritional choices and accept responsibility to change nutritional behaviors to support a healthy pregnancy.

    Prenatal Nutrition Education includes:

  • • An initial assessment of “nutritional risk” based on height, current and pre-pregnancy weight, laboratory data, clinical data, and self-reported dietary information
  • • Ongoing assessment of the pregnant woman’s nutritional status (at least once every trimester) based on dietary information, adequacy of weight gain, measures to assess uterine and fetal growth, laboratory data, and clinical data
  • • Development of an individualized nutrition care plan that addresses the woman’s nutritional deficits, prioritizes her nutritional needs, and proposes interventions and time frames with expected outcomes
  • • Referral to food assistance programs if indicated (WIC, food support, Mothers and Children Program, etc.)
  • • Nutritional interventions and education including:
  • • Nutritional requirements of pregnancy and how nutrition is linked to fetal growth and development
  • • Recommended Dietary Allowance for normal pregnancy
  • • Appropriate weight gain
  • • Importance of vitamin and iron supplements and recommendations for taking them
  • • Infant nutritional needs and feeding practices, including breast feeding
  • • Incorporation of prenatal and postnatal exercise and physical activity
  • Documentation Requirements for Prenatal Nutrition Education
    Documentation requirements include:

  • • A written assessment of the woman’s nutritional status, and evidence of ongoing assessment and monitoring of her nutritional status
  • • A written, individualized nutritional care plan indicating proposed interventions, time-frames, expected outcomes, and evidence of monitoring and ongoing evaluation of the care plan
  • • Evidence that education and information on nutrition was provided, materials used, amount of time spent, notes about the woman’s reactions to the information, review of information at subsequent visits, dates and person(s) providing the service, referrals and follow-up
  • Postpartum Follow-up Home Visit
    The postpartum follow-up home visit (H1004), is in addition to and separate from the mother’s six-week postpartum visit to her primary care provider. It is to be done within the first two weeks of the mother’s hospital discharge.

    This visit gives special support to “at-risk” mothers and infants by following up on identified “at-risk” behaviors or medical conditions, and addressing the stress involved in caring for a new baby. It is an opportunity to provide:

  • • Reinforcement and support for positive behavior changes
  • • Family planning counseling
  • • Anticipatory guidance for healthy parenting
  • • Education about infant care
  • The home visit assesses any needs of the family that will require additional home visits or referrals to appropriate health and social service providers. Services include:

  • • Assessment of the woman’s health
  • • Follow-up on risk behaviors and medical conditions
  • • Reinforcement of positive behavior and lifestyle changes
  • • Physical and emotional changes occurring during the postpartum period
  • • Anticipatory guidance regarding relationship with partner
  • • Sexuality
  • • Potential stress with family
  • • Nutritional needs
  • • Physical activity and exercise
  • • Contraceptive education
  • • Parenting skills and support
  • • Adapting to parenthood
  • • Parent and child relationship; bonding
  • • Child care arrangements and support
  • • Grief support if unexpected outcome
  • • Parenting a sick or preterm infant, if indicated
  • • Follow-up on risk factors and conditions
  • • Assessment of infant’s health
  • • Infant weight and growth
  • • Infant development and abilities
  • Documentation Requirements for Post-Partum Follow-up Visit
    Documentation requirements include:

  • • Written assessment of mother’s and infant’s health, and the home environment
  • • Documentation that education or information on nutrition was provided and evidence of the materials used, amount of time spent, notes about the woman’s reactions to the information, review of information at subsequent visits, dates and person(s) providing the service, referrals and follow-up
  • • Documentation of all referrals made, and follow-up on those referrals
  • • Infant care
  • • Feeding and infant nutritional needs
  • • Recognition of illness in the newborn
  • • Accident and injury prevention
  • • Immunizations and pediatric care
  • • Child and Teen Checkups (C&TC)
  • • Identification and referral of community health and social service resources and assessment of need for additional home visits for either mother or infant
  • Subcutaneous Terbutaline Pump (SQTP)
    Use of the SQTP is a covered service for MHCP recipients. Document in the medical record that the recipient meets the following criteria:

  • • Gestation of 20 weeks or greater but less than 37 weeks
  • • Experiencing symptoms suggestive of preterm labor
  • • Intact amniotic membranes
  • • Cervical dilation <4 cm
  • • Modified or complete bed-rest
  • Screening Ultrasound in Uncomplicated Pregnancy
    DHS allows a single screening ultrasound (ideally conducted at 16-20 weeks gestation) per pregnancy to evaluate gestational age and anatomy, detect multiple pregnancies and to evaluate potential abnormalities. Additional diagnostic ultrasounds are covered only as medically necessary. Indications supporting medical necessity for additional ultrasounds include (but are not limited to):

  • • Abnormal maternal serum analytes
  • • Adjunct to:
  • • Amniocentesis, chorionic villus biopsy, fetal blood sampling
  • • Cervical cerclage placement
  • • External cephalic version
  • • Localization and removal of an intrauterine contraceptive device
  • • Special diagnostic or therapeutic procedures on the fetus
  • • Completion of anatomical screen for inadequate visualization of fetal organs
  • • Confirm fetal viability or fetal death
  • • Diabetes or gestational diabetes
  • • Evaluation of:
  • • A pelvic mass
  • • Incompetent cervix or risk of preterm delivery
  • • Fibroid uterus
  • • Follow-up of observed fetal anomaly
  • • History of previous congenital anomaly
  • • Hyperemesis
  • • Hypertension, essential and pregnancy induced
  • • Identification and follow-up of placenta previa
  • • Nonreactive nonstress test (NST)
  • • Post term pregnancy
  • • Rh sensitization or isoimmunization
  • • Serial evaluation of fetal growth in multiple gestation
  • • Significant uterine size and dates discrepancy
  • • Suspected:
  • • Abruptio placentae
  • • Ectopic pregnancy
  • • Hydatidiform mole
  • • Oligohydramnios or polyhydramnios
  • • Uterine abnormality
  • • Vaginal bleeding
  • Ultrasounds for Zika Virus

    MHCP will cover ultrasounds for the Zika virus if a positive diagnosis is determined from a blood test.

    HIV Counseling and Testing for Pregnant Women

    MHCP follows the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the Minnesota Department of Health that advocate HIV testing for all pregnant women.

    MHCP recommends that all pregnant recipients receive screening, education, counseling and voluntary testing for HIV at the first prenatal visit to ensure timely and therapeutic reproductive decision making. Advances in the treatment of HIV infection, and progress in reducing the transmission of HIV infection to newborns, makes early intervention crucial.

    HIV screening, education, counseling and testing is reimbursed in addition to routine prenatal care. Physician extenders may provide HIV counseling to pregnant women within their scope of practice.

    Keep a consent form or passive consent notification for HIV testing in the medical record. If the recipient refuses HIV testing after counseling, document the refusal in the medical record. Counseling, screening and education for HIV will be reimbursed if provided, whether or not the recipient consents to have HIV testing. Testing will be reimbursed when consent is given and the testing is complete.

    Inform HIV positive pregnant women of their treatment options and of the related HIV services that are available. For more information, call the Program HH office at 651-431-2414 or 800-657-3761.

    Voluntary Testing is when a recipient consents to HIV testing after she receives pretest counseling, is informed of her right to refuse HIV testing, is informed that her refusal will not jeopardize her health benefits, and does not refuse the testing.

    Pretest Counseling includes the following components:

  • • Explanation of what HIV is
  • • Risk factors for HIV infection and how the virus is transmitted
  • • Treatment available for HIV positive women during pregnancy and after delivery
  • • Risk factors for the newborn
  • • Treatment options for the newborn
  • • Rights of the pregnant woman to choose testing
  • • Who has access to test results and confidentiality
  • • HIV risk assessment
  • Post-test Counseling includes the following components:

  • • Give and explain test results
  • • Risk factors for HIV infection and how to reduce the risk of infection
  • • If HIV test results are positive, referrals for additional services and information about treatment options
  • • Information about how the virus is transmitted and how to reduce the risk of transmission
  • • If HIV test results are positive, counseling and referrals related to health issues for partner(s) and children that may have been infected
  • • Information about the need for repeat follow-up testing whether the results are positive or negative
  • • Referral for case management services for HIV positive women and their newborns
  • • Referral to local community support services such as Minnesota AIDS Line 612-373-AIDS (2437), 800-248-AIDS; TTY 612-373-2465, statewide TTY 888-820-2437
  • • Informed Consent: The recipient received the following information:
  • • That HIV testing is voluntary
  • • The entities who have access to HIV test results (such as third party payers or public health agencies)
  • • When, and under what circumstances, this information can be released (such as a legal subpoena)
  • Confidentiality includes documentation indicating that HIV test results are private. Confidential HIV information can be released only to individuals or entities with the written permission of the recipient. You must inform the recipient about the law that allows the release of the HIV test results (without permission) under limited circumstances.

    Positive Test is a test result that is positive for the HIV antibody.

    Negative Test is a test result that is negative for the HIV antibody. Additional follow-up testing, especially for recipients with known recent HIV exposure or with continued risk behaviors, may be needed to determine recent infection.

    Follow-up health services provided to HIV positive women and their infants must include:

  • • Review of what it means to be HIV positive (it does not mean that they have AIDS, but it does mean they can infect others).
  • • Ongoing lab tests to evaluate immune system function
  • • Ongoing counseling regarding HIV status and treatment options
  • • Emphasis on the need for good health practices
  • • Information about current treatment practices to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV and to promote the health of the woman
  • • Information that a positive HIV test result can mean that children and partners could be infected with HIV and that those individuals must be referred for medical testing and follow-up
  • • Information that a baby born to an HIV positive mother must receive regular medical care from a physician who is knowledgeable about HIV treatment to ensure appropriate care
  • • Information that all babies are born with the mother’s antibodies and many months of follow-up are required to determine the newborn’s HIV status. If a baby is not infected, the HIV test will be negative by 18 - 24 months
  • • Discussion with women who are breast feeding or considering breast feeding of the risk of transmission of HIV through breast feeding (the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] recommends that HIV positive women not breast feed)
  • • Emphasize that HIV is not spread through casual contact
  • Noncovered Services

    MHCP does not cover services related to surrogate pregnancies.

    Billing

    Enhanced Services

  • • Bill each enhanced service once per client per pregnancy
  • • Enhanced services will be paid only for “at-risk” pregnant women (at-risk status must be established by prenatal screening)
  • • Primary providers may contract or refer the enhanced services to other MHCP enrolled providers. Enrolled providers performing the service directly bill MHCP
  • • The primary provider who contracts or refers enhanced services to providers not enrolled in MHCP (such as RN or nutritional counselor), must bill MHCP and pay the other provider(s) who performed the services
  • • Physician extender modifiers are not required when billing for enhanced prenatal services
  • Enhanced Services

    HCPCS Code

    Providers Authorized
    to Provide Service and Bill

    “At-risk” Antepartum Management

    H1001

    MD, DO, CNM

    Care Coordination

    H1002

    MD, DO, CNM, CNP, CNS, PA, RN

    Prenatal Health Education I

    H1003

    MD, DO, CNM, CNP, CNS, PA, RN, Health Education Professional*

    Prenatal Health Education II

    H1003

    MD, DO, CNM, CNP, CNS, PA, RN, Health Education Professional*

    Prenatal Nutrition Education

    H1003

    MD, DO, CNM, CNP, CNS, PA**, RN** Dietitian, Nutritionist

    Postpartum Follow-up Home Visit

    H1004

    MD, DO, CNM, CNP, CNS, PA, RN

    * Health educators with at least a baccalaureate level degree in health education or certification for prenatal education from one of the following organizations: ICEA, Lamaze, NCHEC, or IBCLC.

    ** Providers authorized to perform service with documented specialized nutritional education.


    Maternal Health Education

  • • Do not bill for classes that are provided free to non-MHCP recipients
  • • Use HCPCS codes S9442 and S9443 to bill for birthing and lactation classes. Bill one unit for each class encounter. A class that meets for three weeks has three encounters
  • • Public health nursing clinics may bill for maternal health classes, or other group education, using S9446. Bill one unit per recipient for each class encounter. A class that meets for three weeks has three encounters
  • • The following providers may provide and bill for prenatal education classes:
  • • Certified nurse midwives
  • • Clinical nurse specialists
  • Enrolled physicians
  • • Nurse practitioners
  • • Physician assistants
  • • In addition, clinics and outpatient hospitals, whose prenatal education program is directed by one of the enrolled providers listed above, may bill for RNs or health educators with at least a baccalaureate level degree in health education or certification for prenatal education from one of the following organizations:
  • • International Childbirth Education Association (ICEA)
  • • Lamaze, National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC)
  • • International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC)
  • HIV Services for Pregnant Women

  • • Bill for HIV screening, education, counseling and testing in addition to routine prenatal care using the appropriate CPT codes
  • • Physician extenders must use the appropriate modifier
  • Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM)
    Payments for services provided by a CNM are limited to those within the CNM’s scope of practice, provided directly to the patient, and in accordance with Minnesota law.

  • • Do not use a modifier when billing CNM services
  • • Bill CNM services that are part of a clinic or physician practice (group clinic or physician office) using the clinic or physician group NPI as the rendering provider (MN–ITS interactive Providers Tab in the other provider type section)
  • • CNM services as part of a CNM practice, must be billed with the CNM’s individual NPI in MN–ITS as the billing/paid-to provider
  • Breast Pumps
    Codes:
    E0602, E0603, E0604

    MHCP covers breast pumps when ordered by a physician, certified nurse midwife or nurse practitioner for any nursing mother experiencing separation from her infant because of work, school, illness or any other medical reason.

    E0602, manual breast pumps and E0603, personal electric breast pumps, are purchase only. Inform recipients that breast pumps are a personal care item that cannot be shared by mothers and can be used for future pregnancies. The purchase of an electric breast pump is limited to one every three years. Bill with modifier NU.

    E0604, heavy-duty hospital grade electric breast pumps are rental only. Bill with modifier RR. Bill accessory kits for E0604 breast pumps with modifier RA.

    The rental period of heavy-duty hospital grade electric breast pumps (E0604) is three months. Additional months require prior authorization for each additional 30 days.

    If a recipient has a medical necessity for a heavy-duty hospital grade electric breast pump beyond the initial three-month rental period, providers must request authorization for the additional month of rental.

    Bill breast pumps using the mother’s MHCP recipient ID number if the mother is eligible. Bill using the infant’s MHCP recipient ID number if the mother is ineligible. Include the infant’s name, date of birth and gender if billing under the infant’s MHCP recipient ID, not the mother’s information.

    Ambulatory Uterine Monitoring Device
    Follow these guidelines when billing for a uterine monitoring device:

  • • The medical supplier must bill the home uterine monitoring device
  • • MHCP will not pay for days in which data is not transmitted from the patient to the nurse
  • • MHCP will not pay for “add-on” programs such as blood pressure, pulse, weight gain or glucose monitoring
  • Physician Standby Attendance for Newborn
    MHCP will cover a pediatric standby when there is fetal distress. The following examples of fetal distress that may warrant a pediatric standby:

  • • Fetal bradycardia
  • • Diabetes in the mother
  • • Meconium
  • • Premature labor
  • • Foul-smelling amniotic fluid
  • • Mother taking certain medications
  • If the pediatrician bills for standby services, thoroughly document the reason(s) the pediatrician gave unusual services to the infant. Problems such as pronged labor, failure to progress and cephalopelvic disproportions are generally not reasons for billing physician standby services unless fetal distress is also a factor.

    Obstetric Services
    Obstetric care can be billed either globally or by components. The billing method used is the provider’s choice, but only one method can be used for each obstetric case. Follow CPT guidelines for global and component billing.

  • • Do not bill the CPT obstetric panel code unless all components of the laboratory panel are performed
  • • If all components of the panel are not performed, bill the individual laboratory procedure codes you have CLIA approval to bill. Refer to the Laboratory/Pathology, Radiology and Diagnostic Services
  • • Miscellaneous services (for example, amniocentesis, ultrasound, fetal non-stress test, fetal Fibronectin, oxytocin challenge, estriol) must be billed with the appropriate codes
  • • Bill pregnancy and non-pregnancy related services on separate invoices using appropriate ICD-CM diagnoses
  • • MHCP no longer pays a higher rate for vaginal deliveries for women who previously delivered by cesarean section (VBAC). Use the appropriate CPT procedure code
  • • Bill vaginal delivery of multiple gestation births using modifier 22 with the appropriate CPT procedure code
  • • Bill cesarean section done in response to an emergency using the ET modifier with the appropriate CPT procedure code
  • • Bill newborn services using the newborn’s MHCP ID number and date of birth. This includes normal newborn care and any inpatient services to the newborn, whether before or after the mother’s discharge
  • • Bill the mother’s services using the mother’s MHCP ID number
  • • Refer to Inpatient Hospital Authorization for billing instructions when a newborn is transferred to another facility for specialty services
  • • MHCP covers male circumcision only when the procedure is medically necessary
  • Definitions

    At-risk is used to describe a pregnant woman who requires additional prenatal care services because of factors that increase the probability of a preterm delivery, a low birth weight infant or a poor birth outcome.

    Certified Nurse Midwife Practice: The management of women’s primary health care, focusing on pregnancy, childbirth, the postpartum period, care of the newborn, and the family planning and gynecological needs of women, including diagnosing and providing nonpharmacologic treatment within a system that provides for consultation, collaborative management, and referral as indicated by the health status of patients.

    Certified Nurse Practitioner Practice: Within the context of collaborative management, diagnosing, directly managing, and preventing acute and chronic illness and disease, and promoting wellness, including providing nonpharmacologic treatment. The certified nurse practitioner is certified for advanced registered nurse practice in a specific field of nurse practitioner-practice.

    Collaborative Management: A mutually agreed upon plan between a certified nurse practitioner and one or more physicians or surgeons that designates the scope of collaboration necessary to manage the care of patients. The nurse practitioner and the one or more physicians must have experience in providing care to patients with the same or similar medical problems.

    Enhanced Services are services available to recipients identified as “at-risk” for a poor pregnancy outcome. These services are reimbursed in addition to routine obstetric services. Enhanced services include “at-risk” antepartum management, care coordination, prenatal health education I & II, prenatal nutrition education, and postpartum follow-up home visit.

    Low Birth Weight is a birth weight less than 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds).

    Prescribing: The act of generating a prescription for the preparation of, use of, or manner of using a drug or therapeutic device in accordance with Minnesota law. Prescribing does not include recommending the use of a drug or therapeutic device that is not required by the Food and Drug Administration to meet the labeling requirement for prescription drugs and devices.

    Preterm Birth is a birth before the gestational age of 38 weeks.

    Risk Assessment is a standardized prenatal assessment tool, or equivalent, for identification of the medical, genetic, life-style, and psychosocial factors that put a recipient “at-risk” for preterm delivery, a low birth weight infant, or a poor birth outcome.

    Legal References

    Minnesota Rules 9505.0320 (Nurse Midwife Services)
    Minnesota Rules 9505.0353
    (Prenatal Care Services)
    Minnesota Statute 148.171-148.284
    (Minnesota Nurse Practice Act)
    Minnesota Statute 256.969
    , subd. 30 (Payment rates for births)
    Minnesota Statute 256B.0625
    ,
    subd. 13 (Drugs)
    Minnesota Statute 256B.0625
    , subd. 14 (Diagnostic, screening, and preventative services)
    Minnesota Statute 256B.756
    , subd. 1 (Provider rate)
    42 CFR 440.165
    (Nurse-midwife services)
    42 CFR 441.21
    (Nurse-midwife services)

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